Sendember and Rocktober!

These two months are easily my favorite months to get out rock climbing and while Fall is historically a slower time for rock guiding in the Northeast it’s one of the best times to get out and climb! The cliffs are quieter, the black-flies and mosquitoes are long gone, and the cool temps and lower humidity just make rock climbing the thing to do. And don’t get me started on the foliage that is actually starting to show!

Here’s a list of some Fall climbing objectives I’d like to highlight if you think you might want to get out and climb with me before the snow flies.


Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle, Mount Washington

Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle
Guiding Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle, photo by Peter Brandon

This 7 pitch, 900 foot, classic alpine ridge is a must do for every eastern trad climber! Since I have a season pass to the Mount Washington Auto Road I’m offering “Euro-approach” style guided trips to this alpine mecca. Basically by using the Autoroad we save 5 hours of hiking and spend more time climbing! The road closes on October 21st so message me soon if you have a date you’d like to do this!

Requirements: Should be comfortable down-climbing 4th class terrain, and following 5.8. Previous multi-pitch experience required.


Lakeview, Cannon Cliff

Lakeview, Cannon Cliff
Oliver on the 2nd pitch with a good view of the lake! Full trip report of that day here.

This climb was once listed in a climbing magazine article called “Ten Classic Climbs under 5.10”, which is what got me to first climb it in 1994. It’s an excellent introduction to moderate alpine multi-pitch climbing with lots of relaxed slab climbing (some loose rock), and two steeper fantastic pitches at the top. A real pleasure on a nice Fall day!

Requirements: Should be comfortable following 5.6. Previous multi-pitch experience required.


Whitney Gilman, Cannon Cliff

Whitney-Gilman Ridge
Larry after just topping out the 4th pitch, the famously exposed “Pipe Pitch”

The most exposed 5.7 in New England, this sharp alpine ridge is another “must-do” for all eastern trad climbers. After dozens of ascents I still can’t help to marvel over the historic first ascent of this climb that was at one-time, the hardest climb in the US!

Requirements: Should be comfortable following 5.8. Previous multi-pitch experience required.


Endeavor, White Ledge

Endeavor, Whites Ledge, Bartlett NH
Endeavor, Whites Ledge, Bartlett NH photo by Drew Lederman

This is a locals Fall favorite! 5 pitches of excellent climbing ending with a stellar 200 foot jam crack and some of the best Fall foliage views to be had!


Gym to Sport Skills

Gear for Top Rope Climbing
Photo by Corey McMullen

The transition from gym climbing to outdoor sport climbing can be a bit daunting. I’ve been refining my single day curriculum to help ease this transition all summer while teaching clinics at Rumney Rocks. I’ll help you make that transition so you are not left at the top anchor wondering if you set everything up right.


Self-Rescue for the Trad Climber

rock climbing self rescue
Chris learns about the initial awkwardness of rope ascension having already “Escape the Belay”

Do you know how to go “hands-free” on your belay device so you can get your cell phone out of your pack? Better yet can you “escape the belay” so you can go get or provide help? Or better still can you escape the belay and climb up a loaded rope to render potentially life saving first aid?

These skills should be high on the list of anyone who wishes to simply follow multi-pitch climbs! You might need to rescue the leader should an incident occur! Over the years I’ve streamlined this 8 hour day into what I think people should know if they plan on climbing more than one pitch above the ground. Grab your partner and dedicate a day to learning how to practice this skills with me!


Cost

All of these courses are offered at the following rates through my employment with Northeast Mountaineering.

1 person: $250 per person
2 people: $150 per person

If you would like to book any of these contact me first at nealpinestart@gmail.com with the date or dates you are interested in. I will quickly get back to you on availability then you can lock the date down through Northeast Mountaineering using “DavidNEM” in the notes box to help flag the reservation.


Fall is almost officially here and the leaves have started to show some color in most of the notches. I hope you get out there and enjoy the best rock climbing weather the Northeast has to offer!

See you in the mountains,

Northeast Alpine Start

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PSA: Rappel Tree on Sea of Holes No More

Yesterday I climbed Sea of Holes on Whitehorse Ledge with my good friend Benny. As he made the moves past the bolt on the fourth pitch he quickly realized that we would not be doing the original 5.7 finish. The large pine tree that served as the anchor for the end of Sea of Holes and the D’arcy-Crowther Route (pg. 144 North Conway Rock Climbs, Handren) had uprooted.

rock climbing Whitehorse Ledge
Benny at the bolted belay station on the 5.8 variation finish to Sea of Holes with the uprooted tree anchor to his right

There wasn’t much noticeable loose rock or thick root system like the Refuse tree that failed 2 years ago on Cathedral Ledge.

rock climbing Whitehorse Ledge
Not much of a root system

I did not inspect it very closely but it did look a bit hung up on some smaller trees. Hopefully a heavy rain storm will send it the rest of the way down when no one is around. Until then if you plan on climbing Sea of Holes plan to do the 5.8 finish or rap from the 3rd pitch anchor.

See you out there,

Northeast Alpine Start

Tech Tip- How Not to Fall while Skiing Tuckerman Ravine

With the arrival of April the Spring skiing (and falling) season has started in Tuckerman Ravine. After watching a couple tumble almost 500 feet down “The Lip” yesterday I thought some advice on fall prevention might be prudent.

Skiing Tuckerman Ravine
Approximate fall

First tip…

Timing

The snow conditions in Tuckerman Ravine vary greatly this time of year from day to day and often hour to hour. The best type of snow for descending this time of year is referred to as “corn snow”. This is snow that has undergone multiple freeze thaw cycles and looks like little kernels of corn. Backcountry skiers jest that we are “harvesting corn” when the conditions are good. But corn snow is all about timing.

Try to ski too early in the season or the day and the corn hasn’t formed yet. Conditions that promote the formation of good corn snow are close or above freezing temperatures, strong solar radiation, and low winds. Try too ski to late in the day when the sun has dipped below the ridge will often find that the soft buttery edge-able forgiving corn has quickly transformed back into a frozen mess. Literally minutes can make a difference in how a run will ski.

So how do you hit it at the right time? First, you check the Higher Summits Forecast before you even leave Pinkham Notch. You’re hoping that the forecasted temps are at least in the mid to upper 20’s and that summit winds are under 50 mph. You also want to see “Mostly Sunny” or “In The Clear”. Overcast days are not for harvesting corn.

Next you should check the Current Summit Conditions. Specifically what you want from this page is the temperature “profile” that shows what the temperatures are at various elevations on the mountain, wind speeds, and sky condition. This page, along with the Higher Summits Forecast, are both bookmarked on my iPhone for quick daily reference.

Spring Skiing Tuckerman Ravine
MWOBS Current Conditions Page- The ski terrain in the ravine is roughly between 4,200 and 5,200 feet in elevation

Ideally temps in the Ravine will be at or above freezing, winds will be low, and the sky will be mostly clear. The lower charts help identify trends. In the above example the winds have died to almost nothing, temperatures are increasing, and barometric pressure has risen and is holding steady (indicating not a big change for the rest of the day). Visibility however is only 1/8 of a mile with some snow and freezing fog (shown under “weather”)… this means no corn today.

Finally, to determine when the slope you want to descend will lose the sun you have a few tools at your disposal. During trip planning you can use CalTopo’s “Sun Exposure” layer to see when certain aspects and runs will lose the sun. In this example you can see what areas still have sun at 2 PM today.

Skiing Tuckerman Ravine

While actually out skiing you could also use an app like PeakFinder AR. An example of how I might use this app would be climbing up Right Gully and deciding to go ski in the East Snowfields for a bit before returning to descend Right Gully. Halfway up the gully, near the steepest pitch, I open up the PeakFinder app and find the path of the sun. Where it intersects the ridge the app will mark the exact time the sun will go below the ridge line (often an hour or more before true sunset). I know now what time I need to be through this spot if I still want soft snow!

Skiing Tuckerman Ravine
This screenshot is not from Right Gully, but demonstrates the capability

Next up let’s look at…

Gear

Later in the season there will likely be established “boot ladders” where dozens, or hundreds, of other visitors will have kicked deep steps into the 40 to 50 degree slopes allowing people to ascend these slopes with little extra gear.

Skiing Tuckerman Ravine
A well established boot ladder- photo from OutdoorTripReports.com

However, some of these items could really make a difference early in the season, or later in the day, and also could allow you to travel outside of the established boot ladder, which would make you less of a sitting duck if someone higher up looses their footing. First, the most important…

Helmet!

Skida Headwear Review
The author preparing to descend from 4900 feet in Tuckerman Ravine during mid-winter conditions

Most skiers these days wear helmets at ski resorts while ripping fast groomers and shredding pow in the glades but then many choose not to wear a helmet while skiing in Tuckerman Ravine (which has much more objective hazards than a controlled ski resort). Head injuries can occur from falls, collisions with other skiers, and occasionally falling ice and/or rocks. Most ski helmets though are too hot for a 50 degree sunny day in the ravine, so consider buying or borrowing a well ventilated climbing helmet. The new Petzl Boreo Helmet is an excellent choice at a great price and offers more side impact and lower back protection than most climbing helmets. You can pick one up locally at both International Mountain Equipment and Eastern Mountain Sports.

Mountaineering Axe

Skiing Tuckerman Ravine
Crampons and a mountaineering axe provide security on steep firm slopes- photo by Brent Doscher

When the professional rangers of the Mount Washington Avalanche Center say that “long sliding falls” are a specific hazard today one would be wise to carry, and know how to use, a mountaineering axe to arrest or prevent a fall. This would be in hand during the ascent with your ski poles strapped to your pack (baskets up). While there are many models that will suit this purpose I am currently carrying the Black Diamond Raven Ultra Ice Axe which is incredibility light-weight (12 ounces) yet still has a steel head and pick. Lots of experienced skiers like the added flexibility of carrying a Black Diamond Whippet Pole instead of a full fledged mountaineering axe, and if snow conditions are soft enough this can be a great option.

Crampons

Skiing Tuckerman Ravine
Petzl LLF Crampons- photo from Petzl.com

While an established boot pack might feel secure leaving the boot back or taking the path less traveled may require some traction. Micro-spikes might be helpful on the lower angled hiking trail below Hermit Lake (Hojo’s) but won’t cut it in 40 degree terrain. For snowboard boots check out the Black Diamond Neve Strap Crampons. For those who count ounces and wear technical touring boots my current favorite is the feather-weight Petzl Leopard LLF Crampons.

Education

skiing Tuckerman Ravine
The author heads into steeper terrain in the Gulf of Slides, Mount Washington- photo by Erik Howes

If you would like to take a course in basic crampon and mountaineering axe technique I teach a one-day skills course at Northeast Mountaineering. I also offer Backcountry Skiing Skills Courses along with Ski Mountaineering and this is the perfect time of year to attend one of these courses! Contact me at nealpinestart@gmail.com for availability.

Resources

Higher Summits Forecast

Current Summit Conditions

Mount Washington Avalanche Center

Mount Washington Volunteer Ski Patrol

Time for Tuckerman

Friends of Tuckerman Ravine

Granite Backcountry Alliance

Ski the Whites

Summary

Skiing (and falling) in Tuckerman Ravine is a time-honored tradition and rite-of-passage for many East Coast and beyond skiers. YouTube is full of videos of these falls. Some result in no injury, others result in “snow rash”, bruises, cuts, broken bones, a least one LifeFlight, and occasional fatalities, one of which was exactly 8 years ago. Hopefully the above advice can help prevent a few of these from happening this season. There is a lot of fun and sun to be had in the next few weeks in Tuckerman Ravine but let’s be sure we respect the hazards that exist in our wild places.

See you in the mountains,

Northeast Alpine Start

Trip Report- Parasol Gully, Dixville Notch State Park, 3-6-18

I’ve been seeing this climb pop up on my social media feeds a few times this season and have been looking for a chance to get up to Dixville Notch and check it out. Today was the day so last night while searching for a partner I connected with my friend AJ. He was planning on a solo romp in Huntington and mentioned Parasol felt like a far drive for “just a pitch or so of moderate ice”…

I layed on some pretty heavy partner guilt and convinced him to join me while also deciding to see how this route might compare “time-wise” to say a standard ascent of Pinnacle. With the guilt trip successful we drove by Pinkham Notch Visitor Center this morning and I hit “start” on my stop watch.

dixville map

The drive up Route 16 to Gorham goes quickly, and the stretch to Berlin is quick enough though I’m always cautious there of speed traps. Waze kept us on the truck route which feels a bit slow and “residential” but as soon as you leave Berlin proper the road opens up to fast-moving-scenic-cruising and a few good conversations later found us turning on to Route 26 in Errol, NH.

This stretch is classic scenic “North Woods” type NH and has ample passing lanes to get around any slow moving logging trucks. We soon found ourselves pulling into Dixville Notch State Park about when we would probably be passing Harvard Cabin if we were hiking up to Huntington Ravine. The geography in this notch is super impressive and reminiscent of Eldorado Canyon or somewhere more “western”.

Parasol Gully, Dixville Notch, New Hampshire
Parasol Gully, Dixville Notch, New Hampshire

The approach to the ice was only about 7 minutes but the thin icy snow cover required crampons pretty much right after leaving the roadway. In hindsight, and with current conditions, I’d just choose to rack up at the car and clip my belay jacket to the back of my harness.

Parasol Gully, Dixville Notch, New Hampshire
Parasol Gully, Dixville Notch, New Hampshire

I led the first pitch choosing to stay far left on the ice flow where the ice was classic soft “hero” ice.

Parasol Gully, Dixville Notch, New Hampshire
Leading the first pitch, photo by Mountain Life International

I ran it about 190 feet passing one v-thread to a second one just as AJ signaled I was almost out of rope (60m). A quick screw to equalize with the existing v-thread had AJ climbing and he soon passed me to lead the second pitch as I noted we would probably be reaching the base of Pinnacle at about this time.

Parasol Gully, Dixville Notch, New Hampshire
The Balsams grand hotel below…
Parasol Gully, Dixville Notch, New Hampshire
Two hours from passing Pinkham Notch has us starting the 2nd pitch
Parasol Gully, Dixville Notch, New Hampshire
AJ takes it to the top

AJ cruised the 120 or so feet to the top and we were soon coiling our ropes and heading over to a straightforward steep snow descent to climbers right of the route. Total descent took about 10-15 minutes and we were back at the car by 11:30.

Parasol Gully, Dixville Notch, New Hampshire
Fast steep snow descent located about 100 yards to climbers right of the route

Our car to car time was only about an hour and as we drove past Pinkham Notch Visitor Center on our way back home I noted it was 4 hours since we passed earlier…

While this climb is not truly “alpine” or above treeline it is in a remarkable setting! I get why it makes some lists as a “top ten NH ice climb”! Considering average hike time from Pinkham to roping up in Huntington is usually 2+ hours this is a good option for a day when you just want a good couple pitches of ice and not a lot of walking!

My gear recommendations in current “FAT” conditions:

Light ice rack (6-8 screws)

One 60m single rope <- my current favorite is the Sterling Fushion Nano IX

Even with the V-threads and fixed anchor at the top I think walking off would be a bit faster than rapping. Deeper snow might even allow for some good glissading. About half way down the descent gully look for a short side step out to a nice view point with a miniature “gendarme”!

While I feel a little guilty about pulling my friend off his more alpine objective I think we both felt the classic nature of the route justified the longer time in the car and we are both eager to explore this area more. As cool as the rock around there looks locals report that it is quite choss for the most part. It certainly looks quite different from most NH granite and I’d like to learn more about the geology in that area.

A short YouTube clip of the day:

 

If you are looking for a fun 2 pitch Grade 2+ route with a super short approach and easy descent that is unlikely to be crowded check this place out! Even if there are a couple cars in the small pullout this shouldn’t get to jammed with such a straightforward approach/descent. I’ll certainly be heading back there again!

See you in the mountains,

Northeast Alpine Start

Square Ledge, Waterfall Rappelling, Mount Washington, then back to Square!

What a great and busy long weekend that was! The weather for the most part was better than forecasted and I got out the last four days for quite the mixed bag of fun. This past Thursday I met up with my friend Alex to shoot some video and pics to go along with an in-depth review I’m writing on the new Petzl Sirocco climbing helmet coming out early this summer (stay tuned!). After some shooting we got some climbing in, the highlight was definitely watching my friend Brittni lead her first New Hampshire trad climb!

rock climbing new hampshire
Brit cruises her first NH trad lead (and second ever), “The Chimney”, at Square Ledge- photo by @alexandraroberts

On Friday I guided my first ever Waterfall Rappelling trip. Despite some chilly water temps this young couple had a blast and rappelled the 140 foot waterfall three times together!

Waterfall Rappelling White Mountains New Hampshire
Adventurous way to spend your birthday weekend!

Saturday I traded shorts and t-shirt for full on winter clothing to co-guide 19 inspiring hikers up Mount Washington in quite burly conditions to raise money for the 5 most severely wounded veterans in New Hampshire via AidClimb. Below freezing temps, 50 mph winds, low visibility, rain and sleet, all provided a very memorable June ascent for everyone involved. I’m incredibly grateful to have been able to play a small part in this fundraiser that has raised over $30,000 for these veterans and their families!

Climbing Mount Washington
Summiting Washington in winter conditions… in June

Finally I finished off the weekend Sunday back in t-shirt weather co-guiding a Cliff Rappelling course for a group of 8 Bostonians who came up for the day as part of a Meetup.com event.

Cliff rappelling White Mountains New Hampshire
Pretty scenic spot to learn how to rappel right?

I love swinging from 10 degree wind chills to 60 degree sunny weather within 24 hours! New Hampshire White Mountain weather will certainly keep you on your toes! I hope everyone had a good weekend as it looks like the start of this week will be a bit damp. It gives me time to catch up on some reading and writing I’d like to do and store my winter gear again for the season… or maybe I should keep it handy…

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See you in the mountains,

Northeast Alpine Start

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Intro to Ice Climbing

This past Wednesday I had the opportunity to introduce four guests of Northeast Mountaineering to the joys of ice climbing. The North End of Cathedral is in great shape for early season climbing and we had a full day climbing on the North End Slab and the Pillars.

Yesterday I got out to Frankenstein for the first time this season and enjoyed an excellent condition Pegasus Rock Finish.

This is quickly shaping up to be one of the best ice climbing seasons in recent memory. If you’d like to book a lesson with me let me know, I still have some mid-week dates available.

http://www.nemountaineering.com/ice-climbing/guided-ice-climbing-1-day/

If you book online use coupon code “DavidNEM” to have a chance at winning a free guided day!

See you in the mountains,

Northeast Alpine Start

Mount Washington Ascent 12-19-16

This past Monday I headed up to the rockpile again with Virginia/Maryland based Max & Rachel. After gearing up at the Northeast Mountaineering bunkhouse we hit the trail at about 8:15. Following last weeks snow/rain/deep freeze trail conditions were quite nice on the lower Tuckerman Trail. The first “step” on Winter Lionhead had considerable water ice but full crampons and ice axe, and a little coaching saw us through it in quick time. Above this step cramponing was great all the way to the summit which we reached around 1:15pm in really low wind conditions. Definitely a great day on the mountain and I hope to see Max & Rachel back for another adventure this winter!

See you in the mountains,

Northeast Alpine Start

P.S. If you decide to book an adventure with Northeast Mountaineering use promo code “DavidNEM” to get a chance at winning a free guided day of your choosing!